[Guest Post] The Poetry of the Little-Known Red Brick Gallery

Dichen Ding is an Architectural Designer in New York City. She was born in China, received her Master of  Architecture from Columbia University and is currently working for TEN Arqitectos.

The Red Brick Art Gallery not only holds valuable artwork within its brick shell, but also offers amazingly choreographed and masterfully-crafted brick spaces that unfold as you move through them. Located in Northeastern Chaoyang District, Beijing No.1 International Art District, the entire gallery complex is around 20,000 square meters (about 180,000 sf) and the gallery itself takes up half that area. The Red Brick Art Gallery was founded by art collector Shijie Yan and Mei Cao and opened on May 23rd, 2014; the architect behind the gallery and its garden is Yugan Dong, a professor at Peking University’s architectural research center.  Dong is an architect who specializes in the use of red bricks; in this project he continues his exploration of red brick as an essential architectural element.  His efforts form a unique architectural language – as well as peaceful contemporary garden – in this modern gallery.

Top Image: Red Brick Art Gallery, All Photos Courtesy Red Brick Art Gallery.

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Building Tall With… Recycled Paper?

I’m very excited to inaugurate a (hopefully) recurring column on Architizer – titled New Archetypes – that explores how architects experiment with small projects to produce very unique designs. This entry focuses on a 20 foot tall pavilion built from recycled paper pulp, the exact same material found in your Starbucks coffee tray and cardboard moving boxes. The ‘Pulp Pavilion,’ designed by L.A.-based Ball-Nogues Studio, shaded visitors to this year’s Coachella Music and Arts Festival.

Read on to learn more!

Link to the Architizer Article

Top Image: The Pulp Pavilion, Courtesy Ball-Nogues Studio via Architizer

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The ‘Artichair’ Is Literally ‘Green Design’

Sometimes a new material can revitalize a classic look. The Eames’ colorful fiberglass chairs used to be a staple of living rooms and classrooms alike. While that fiberglass material is durable, it’s not 100% biodegradable, unlike this new substance from Greek designer Spyros Kizis. Read on for details on how he turned wild artichoke fibers into a very “green” design.

Link to the Curbed Article

Top Image: The Artichair, Photo Courtesy Spyros Kizis.